Desktop Fluency System

About: The Desktop Fluency System was a DAF/FAF anti-stuttering device manufactured by Casa Futura Technologies from 1994 to 2002.

Evidence: 13 studies used the Desktop Fluency System.

Desktop Fluency System

Desktop Fluency System

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casafuturatech.com
Average rating:  
 2 reviews
by Daniel Clark on casafuturatech.com
Use it every work day

I obtained the Desktop Fluency System in late 2002. The device has been connected to my work phone pretty much every since. The device has allowed me to answer the phone at work, and to speak much more fluently than if I didn't have the device. I really like that it is adjustable, as sometimes I think my brain gets used to the signal with amount of delayed feedback and auditory sound, so switching it up really seem to help keep the choral speech effects up.



Overall, I would highly recommend this or any other device Casafuturatech produces. I was one of the first to get a SpeechEasy device. It sits in my desk drawer at work and I haven't used it in several years. You can't hear with the device and it just doesn't work very well in the real world. By contrast the desktop fluency device works consistently better and has every day now for 13 years. I'm dreading the day (hopefully never) that the device stops working.



Anyway, a little about me, I'm a Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for Yakima County. I graduated Cum Laude in the top 1/3 of my class from Gonzaga School of law in 2002, and although I'm a severe stutterer, this device helps me perform my job and talk to clients on the phone.

by Paul Goldstein on casafuturatech.com
Very useful and effective device

I found [the Desktop Fluency System, no longer made] to be most helpful and effective, as well as highly versatile. I obtained my first model in 1995, and for the first month I used it my phone conversation (which often can be severely disfluent) was always fluent without exception. After the first month, I did experience a partial wearing-off effect, but the device still remained quite effective, and nearly always reduced my disfluency on bad days and enabled me to speak fluently on good days. The device has a variety of settings of different types of altered feedback, and can also combine them - so it was interesting to experiment to find what worked the best, and I changed settings around often. There's also a useful adjustable feature for self-practice which judges the intensity of one's voice onsets or phonation - I made use of this often in practicing fluency shaping targets. By far this is the best fluency device I've encountered. I did find, though, that it's not compatible with all phone systems.